top of page
  • Writer's pictureFrederique Peeters

NUTRITIONAL THERAPY: A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO HEALING


Food is medicine
Nutritional Therapy

Food is medicine. It's a simple concept, but it's one that's often overlooked. Nutritional therapy is a holistic approach to health that focuses on using food to heal and prevent disease. It's a personalized approach, taking into account your individual needs, goals, and lifestyle.


It has a long and rich history. Ancient civilizations, such as the Egyptians and Greeks, understood the importance of food for health. In the 19th century, doctors began to use diet to treat disease and in the 20th century, nutritional therapy emerged as a distinct field.


The foods you eat have a profound impact on your health affecting your energy levels, mood, weight, and overall well-being. Choosing the right foods can help you prevent disease, improve your symptoms, and optimize your health.


Some of the conditions that can be improved through nutritional therapy include:


1. Digestive problems, such as IBS.

  • by helping you identify and eliminate trigger foods. Once you know which foods to avoid, you can create a personalized diet plan that helps you manage your symptoms.

  • by helping improve digestive function through increasing your intake of fiber and other nutrients that are essential for gut health.

  • reducing inflammation in the gut, which is a major underlying cause of IBS symptoms.

  • supporting the microbiome. The microbiome is the community of trillions of bacteria that live in your gut. A healthy microbiome is essential for digestive health and overall well-being. Nutritional therapy can help to support the microbiome by providing the nutrients it needs to thrive.

2. Skin conditions, such as eczema, psoriasis, and acne.

  • by helping get enough Omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties, which can help to reduce the itching and redness associated with eczema. Good sources of omega-3 fatty acids include fatty fish, such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel, as well as flaxseed oil and walnuts.

  • helping making sure you incorporate probiotics into your diet. Probiotics are live bacteria that are beneficial for gut health. A healthy gut microbiome can help to reduce inflammation and improve skin health. Good sources of probiotics include yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, and kimchi.

  • Helping you hit Vitamin D targets. Vitamin D is important for immune function and skin health. Low levels of vitamin D have been linked to eczema. Good sources of vitamin D include sunlight, fatty fish, and fortified foods.

  • making sure your diet is Anti-inflammatory. An anti-inflammatory diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. It also limits processed foods, unhealthy fats, and red meat. Eating an anti-inflammatory diet can help to reduce the inflammation associated with psoriasis.

  • Ensuring your diet has a low-glycemic-load. A low-glycemic-load diet avoids foods that cause blood sugar levels to spike quickly. This type of diet has been shown to improve acne symptoms.

  • Making sure you are getting enough Zinc. Zinc is a mineral that is important for skin health. Zinc supplements have been shown to be effective in reducing acne symptoms.

3. Autoimmune diseases, such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis, rheumatoid arthritis, and Crohn's disease.

  • by advising you on a gluten-free diet. A gluten-free diet has been shown to improve symptoms in some people with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This is because gluten can trigger inflammation in the gut, which can worsen thyroid symptoms.

  • Advising you on Selenium supplementation. Selenium is a mineral that is important for thyroid function and antioxidant protection. Selenium supplements have been shown to improve symptoms in some people with Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  • helping you create an Anti-inflammatory diet. An anti-inflammatory diet can help to reduce the inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis. This type of diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. It also limits processed foods, unhealthy fats, and red meat.

  • making sure you get enough good omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties and may help to improve rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. Good sources of omega-3 fatty acids include fatty fish, such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel, as well as flaxseed oil and walnuts.

  • Helping you hit Vitamin D targets. Vitamin D is important for immune function and bone health. Low levels of vitamin D have been linked to rheumatoid arthritis. Good sources of vitamin D include sunlight, fatty fish, and fortified foods.

  • Developing a specific carbohydrate diet (SCD). The SCD is a restrictive diet that eliminates certain carbohydrates, such as lactose, gluten, and some starches. The SCD has been shown to reduce inflammation and improve symptoms in some people with Crohn's disease.

  • Developing a low-FODMAP diet. The low-FODMAP diet is a diet that is low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols. FODMAPs are a type of carbohydrate that can trigger digestive problems in some people with Crohn's disease.

  • making sure you are getting good probiotics. Probiotics may help to improve Crohn's disease by reducing inflammation and improving gut health. Good sources of probiotics include yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, and kimchi.

4. Mental health conditions, such as depression, anxiety, and ADHD.

  • making sure you consume good omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties and are thought to play a role in the production of serotonin, a neurotransmitter that helps to regulate mood. Good sources of omega-3 fatty acids include fatty fish, such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel, as well as flaxseed oil and walnuts.

  • Helping you hit B vitamin targets. B vitamins are essential for the production of neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and dopamine. Low levels of B vitamins have been linked to depression. Good sources of B vitamins include whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds.

  • Helping you hit vitamin D targets. Vitamin D is important for mood regulation and immune function. Low levels of vitamin D have been linked to depression. Good sources of vitamin D include sunlight, fatty fish, and fortified foods.

  • Making sure you incorporate enough Magnesium into your diet. Magnesium is a mineral that is important for nerve function and relaxation. Low levels of magnesium have been linked to anxiety. Good sources of magnesium include nuts, seeds, dark leafy greens, and whole grains.

  • Advising on good sources of L-theanine. L-theanine is an amino acid that has calming and relaxing properties. Good sources of L-theanine include green tea, matcha, and black tea.

  • Advising on supplements such as Ashwagandha. Ashwagandha is an adaptogenic herb that can help to reduce stress and anxiety. Ashwagandha supplements are available at most health food stores.

  • Making sure you incorporate good sources of zinc into your diet. Zinc is a mineral that is important for brain function and development. Low levels of zinc have been linked to ADHD. Good sources of zinc include oysters, beef, and pumpkin seeds.

  • making sure you are getting enough iron. Iron is a mineral that is important for oxygen transport to the brain. Low levels of iron have been linked to ADHD. Good sources of iron include red meat, poultry, and beans.

5. Hormonal imbalances, such as PCOS, menopause, and low testosterone.

  • Helping you acheive weight loss goals. Losing even a small amount of weight can help to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce symptoms of PCOS, such as irregular periods, acne, and excess hair growth.

  • Curating a Low-glycemic-load diet. A low-glycemic-load diet avoids foods that cause blood sugar levels to spike quickly. This type of diet can help to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce PCOS symptoms.

  • Advising you on Inositol supplementation. Inositol is a nutrient that is important for insulin sensitivity and fertility. Inositol supplements have been shown to improve PCOS symptoms, such as irregular periods and infertility.

  • Guiding you in Calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Calcium and vitamin D are important for bone health. Women are at increased risk of osteoporosis after menopause, so it is important to get enough calcium and vitamin D.

  • Helping you eat the right phytoestrogens. Phytoestrogens are plant compounds that have estrogen-like effects. Eating foods that are rich in phytoestrogens, such as soybeans, tofu, and flaxseed, may help to reduce menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes and night sweats.

  • Advising you on good sources of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties and may help to reduce menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes and joint pain. Good sources of omega-3 fatty acids include fatty fish, such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel, as well as flaxseed oil and walnuts.

  • Making sure you are getting enough zinc. Zinc is a mineral that is important for testosterone production. Good sources of zinc include oysters, beef, and pumpkin seeds.

  • Advising on vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D is important for testosterone production and overall health. Good sources of vitamin D include sunlight, fatty fish, and fortified foods.

6. Chronic diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes

  • Curating a personalised Mediterranean diet. The Mediterranean diet is a heart-healthy diet that is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and healthy fats. The Mediterranean diet has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, and other chronic diseases.

  • Advsing you on good sources of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties and may help to reduce the risk of heart disease. Good sources of omega-3 fatty acids include fatty fish, such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel, as well as flaxseed oil and walnuts.

  • making sure you are incorporating enough fiber into your diet. Fiber helps to lower cholesterol levels and improve blood sugar control. Good sources of fiber include fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

  • Creating a personalised Anti-inflammatory diet. An anti-inflammatory diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. It also limits processed foods, unhealthy fats, and red meat. Eating an anti-inflammatory diet may help to reduce the risk of cancer.

  • Making sure you eat enough cruciferous vegetables. Cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts, contain compounds that have been shown to fight cancer.

  • Helping you choose the right Berries for you. Berries are rich in antioxidants, which can help to protect cells from damage. Good sources of berries include strawberries, blueberries, and raspberries.

  • Creating a Low-glycemic-load diet. A low-glycemic-load diet avoids foods that cause blood sugar levels to spike quickly. This type of diet can help to improve blood sugar control and reduce the risk of complications from diabetes.

  • Making sure your diet contains the right amount of fiber. Fiber helps to slow down the digestion of food and prevent blood sugar spikes. Good sources of fiber include fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

  • Helping you choose Healthy fats. Healthy fats, such as those found in olive oil, avocados, and nuts, can help to improve blood sugar control and reduce the risk of heart disease.

Nutritional therapy is a safe and effective way to improve your health and well-being. If you're interested in learning more, schedule a consultation with a qualified nutritional therapist today.

or



18 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Kommentare


bottom of page